Female Infertility due to Stress ... 2

Female Infertility due to  stress    2








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Female Infertility due to Stress    2
Posted in 2014


What are some practical ways women trying to get pregnant can reduce stress? Experts make these recommendations:
Enlist your partner. Research shows that women handle infertility-related stress differently from men. Women more often seek social support, for example; men lean towards problem-solving. That disconnect can strain the relationship. Constant attention on procreation, according to psychologist Julia Woodward of the Duke Fertility Center in Durham, N.C., also contributes, siphoning the fun and joy from sex. She advises couples to act as if they were dating again. Set aside time during the week to go to a movie. Take a dance class together. And put a time limit of 20 minutes or so on pregnancy discussions. Fertility talk that goes on and on can make matters worse, she says.
Rethink your attitude. Thinking "everybody else gets pregnant so easily" only causes distress. Woodward helps women counter their negativity with positive coping statements: "If getting pregnant was so easy, there wouldn't be fertility clinics." Recognize pessimistic thinking and practice forming a response that is more realistic.
Try journaling. Setting down on paper how you feel can take some of the pressure off, says Tracy Gaudet, executive director of Duke Integrative Medicine. It's a way to off-load concerns you feel uncomfortable sharing, she says. And you can shred the pages or throw them out, a physical act that contributes to the effect.
Stay active. Continuing activities you enjoy is critical, says Woodward; otherwise the pregnancy project becomes the sole focus. Take pictures, plan special meals—whatever your passion, indulge it. Doing something enjoyable also boosts serotonin, a mood-enhancing brain chemical. That's an added bonus.
Work on relaxation. One easy way, Gaudet suggests, is to spend time once or twice a day coaxing the body into a state of deep relaxation. Take five minutes or so to close your eyes and transport yourself to a far-off destination, a mini-mental vacation. Allow yourself to experience all the senses of your surroundings, says Gaudet, and your body will respond as if you are actually there. The benefits of the "relaxation response" include a slower heart rate and lower blood pressure. If a specific kind of technique is preferred, there's no shortage of choices. Meditation, yoga, and progressive muscle relaxation are just a few.

My advise
1....  Stress can interfere with conception. In fact, if you're having a hard time getting pregnant, people may have already said to you, "Just relax and it will happen." Although this can feel insulting, there's a kernel of truth to it.
2....   That's because stress can affect the functioning of the hypothalamus – the gland in the brain that regulates your appetite and emotions, as well as the hormones that tell your ovaries to release eggs. If you're stressed out, you may ovulate later in your cycle or not at all. So if you're only having sex around day 14, thinking that you're about to ovulate, you may miss your opportunity to conceive.
3...    It's important to differentiate between constant and sudden stress. If your stress level is high but fairly consistent, your body will likely acclimate to it and you'll probably still ovulate each cycle. It's sudden stress – such as an accident or a death in the family – that can throw your cycle off and interfere with ovulation.
4....   Of course, this varies from woman to woman. Some women find that even a trip out of town can delay ovulation. Others have found that a severely traumatic incident didn't impact their cycle at all.
5.....  It's also important to remember that stress isn't only a reaction to something negative. Positive stress can also affect your cycle, causing you to ovulate later or not at all. Brides often report strange cycles because they're happily stressed about their weddings.
6....   The good news is that delayed ovulation simply lengthens your entire cycle. It doesn't shorten the luteal phase – typically lasting 12 to 16 days after ovulation to the start of your next menstrual period. This is important because a short luteal phase has been linked to early   miscarriage       
7.....  I advise every woman to be happy and eat healthy food to conceive.

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